Why is Texas highway pipeline being monitored by law enforcement?

Texas Governor Greg Abbott said Friday that federal law enforcement agencies will be conducting traffic checks at several pipeline projects that could pose a threat to the state’s natural resources.

A spokesman for Abbott said that the governor is reviewing the pipeline’s construction in an effort to ensure that it complies with all environmental, regulatory, safety and health standards.

The governor said the Department of Transportation (DOT) has received numerous reports of construction-related injuries and deaths in Texas.

The state has been working to improve safety for pipeline workers.

In April, the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration announced that it was monitoring the construction of two proposed oil and gas pipelines.

The agency said it would issue an emergency permit if conditions became dangerous or unsafe, and said the project was not in compliance with the Federal Pipeline Safety Act.

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In July, an explosion killed a man and injured four others when a pipeline ruptured in western Texas.

In November, the state said that construction of a pipeline that could transport crude oil in North Dakota was “under review” after an oil spill in the area killed two workers.

The pipeline’s route passed through a tribal land and an industrial property.

How to tell if your house is covered in snow

Posted September 15, 2018 07:06:47 With a new snowfall forecast expected to start early in the new year, some people are being forced to dig out their homes for their winter necessities.

While some homes will remain open, others may not be as safe.

“If I’m going to be in my car and I have a shovel, I’m not going to leave my house in the winter,” one resident told the ABC.

Many people have told the broadcaster that they were surprised at how easy it was to dig a hole. “

We’re not going anywhere, we’re not in any danger, but it’s really not safe.”

Many people have told the broadcaster that they were surprised at how easy it was to dig a hole.

“This is just such a basic human instinct, but we’re trying to survive,” one person said.

“It’s very simple.

We have to dig in our homes.”

Another said they had to use a hacksaw and a hammer to dig through a hole in the ground.

“The problem with it is we’re used to digging in the snow, so it’s easy,” one said.

“It’s kind of like we’re always doing this, but I’ve got this tool in my hand, and I just need to get it to the bottom.”

How to watch the parade in Dixie Highway from the top of Cascade Lakes highway

A parade is scheduled to take place this year at Cascade Lakes Highway and Cascade Lakes Road on the northern end of Cascade Lake.

The annual event will begin at 5 p.m.

Thursday at Cascade Falls, which is near the mouth of the dam at Cascade Lake, the county’s only source of drinking water.

The procession will then travel along the highway to Cascade Lakes, a mile-long loop on the Cascade Lakes Water Treatment Plant and return to Cascade Falls.

This year’s event is being organized by the Northern Cascade Lake Fire Protection District and the Northern Sierra Club.

It’s expected to draw about 1,000 participants.

The event was announced last week.

“This is an opportunity to connect the community to one another and to share our beautiful, pristine lands with all,” said Nancy Hoeber, a spokeswoman for the Northern Lakes Fire Protection.

“Our community is in a precarious situation with the threat of catastrophic drought, but we are not at the point of needing the additional resources of a parade.

The people of Northern Lakes want to see our beautiful region protected and restored.

We have our parks, lakes, waterfalls, and recreation areas that we can share and show off to the public.

We are a unique, diverse community that deserves a celebration like this.”

The event will feature a performance by local artist and songwriter Dixie Hill, who will perform in the parade along with a song from her upcoming album.

The song “Lets Make It Happen” is written about the drought and is inspired by the drought’s impact on her family’s water and the way it affects the water supply.

It is sung by Hoebers daughters, Taehee and Taegan, as well as by an unknown number of participants.

A video posted on the Northern Lake Fire Service’s Facebook page on Wednesday shows a procession of vehicles, with the message “Dixie Highway.”

The video shows a truck, with a woman in the front seat, driving in a convoy of trailers, which includes a fire engine, two trailers with a person on each one, a bus, and a truck with a man in the back.

A vehicle with the words “DEEP DRAIN” written on it appears behind the bus.

It then appears on a trailer that was in the convoy, which was carrying a water tank.

It continues to drive past, with an unidentified man in a white van.

It can be seen with a red light and the phrase “DIE DRAINS.”

“It is so important to us to get out there and show our support for our community and our people and the things that we care about,” said Hoebert.

“I am proud to say we have some of the best people in the world and we have a group of amazing people who have really helped build this beautiful community and they want to make sure that we are proud of it.”

The Northern Lakes’ population is growing, from 2,200 in 2011 to more than 4,000 in 2016.

The Northern Sierra is growing as well, from about 6,000 to more then 12,000 people.

A recent census estimated that the Northern District of the United States had about 2,700 residents.

It has about 9,000 homes and about 13,000 commercial and industrial buildings.

It includes the largest concentration of people living in the state of Washington.

In 2017, the Northern California-based organization the Sierra Club organized the Dixie Valley Fair, which has grown into the largest fair in the United State, drawing hundreds of thousands of visitors.

The Dixie Water Fair, on May 22, is a celebration of the natural water supply and environmental stewardship.