OREGON highway closures for next week as floodwaters threaten to shut down the road for two weeks

A flood that has shut down Highway 1 north of the city of Eugene, Oregon, and damaged a major bridge in Portland has caused delays in the construction of several major highways, including the East Coast Highway that runs through the state.

The Oregon Department of Transportation said Thursday that the East Oregon Tollway will close temporarily from Monday to Friday as flood waters continue to surge in the Portland area.

The agency said a portion of the Eastbound East Oregon Highway will close at 10 a.m.

Monday through Wednesday, while a portion from the Westbound East Coast Tollway from 10 a and 6 p.m., and the Oregon Highway from 10 p. and 4 a. m. will remain open for a day.

Construction of the Interstate 5 and 5-Line Freeway, which is part of the interstate system, will resume Thursday morning, the agency said.

The highway, which spans from the northern Oregon town of Whitefish to the city and surrounding towns of Salem, is a major artery for drivers heading to the Oregon Coast.

The Interstate 5 bridge over the Columbia River, the main artery through Oregon, is closed for a short time on Thursday as floodwater surges over the bridge, the Oregon Department’s Bureau of Transportation spokesman, John Anderson, said.

“There is an ongoing water level at the bridge.

There’s a lot of water in the bridge,” he said.

There is no immediate threat to the bridge’s life.

It’s currently under reconstruction, he said, adding that the bridge will be open later Thursday for people who need to cross it.

The bridge, which was built in 1965, has a bridge span of about 15 feet and has a water level of about 2 feet, he added.

The roadway will remain closed from 10:30 p. m., Wednesday through Sunday.

Officials have said the road will reopen Friday afternoon, when the river will resume flowing, but Anderson said he could not provide more information about the exact date.

The flood, which has caused more than $100 million in damage, has forced the closure of all major highways in the state for two days.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said the agency is monitoring the flood for any further damage.

“This is a very large and complex project,” FEMA Administrator Brock Long said Thursday.

“We are still working to identify and assess the damage to the road.

There will be significant impacts to the state and our nation’s economy.”

In Washington state, a flood that was expected to have minimal impact on the state’s highways has prompted the closure for a week of major highways.

The Highway 99 bridge, one of the major arteries through the Northwest, was shut down at 1 p. e.m.(Pacific time) Thursday and the bridge is expected to be open for two more days.

State officials say that the shutdown is expected “as a result of increased water levels in the Columbia river and to protect against flooding during a severe weather event,” which could result from a possible cyclone or flood.

Highway 99 from Olympia to Tacoma is closed as crews begin work to rebuild the bridge that spans from Oregon to Washington state.

It was closed on Monday for the second time this week after heavy rain in the Northwest.

The National Weather Service said Thursday morning that the state is facing a “very high” risk of severe weather and that conditions may worsen as the day goes on.

Flooding is expected on Thursday in Oregon and other states that have received heavy rainfall.

The Washington Department of Emergency Management said it has been working with the National Weather Services and the U.S. Coast Guard to monitor the flood situation and to provide critical updates.

The federal agency also tweeted on Thursday that it is sending more than a dozen National Guard aircraft to help with the rebuilding efforts.

The Coast Guard says it will deploy four aircraft and six watercraft to help restore the Columbia’s capacity to release storm surge from the region.

The agencies said that the National Guard has already deployed to the area, but that the Coast Guard expects the flood waters to increase significantly in the coming days.

“Our teams will remain on the ground and continue to provide immediate assistance to people and structures as conditions dictate,” the National Coast Guard tweeted.

“In the meantime, we have begun the process of evacuating the area.

We are working closely with the local and state governments to assess and assess damage to infrastructure.”

The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, which operates the Columbia and other waterways, issued a flood warning for portions of the Columbia from Seattle to Tacoma.

In a statement Thursday, the Corps said it is working to maintain its capacity to provide essential services to people in need.

The Corps warned that the storm surge will cause significant damage to homes and businesses.

Floodwaters are expected to rise as high as 14 feet in some areas and 12 feet in others.

The Columbia River is the nation’s fourth-largest river, and is considered a major source of flooding and erosion.

The river’s banks stretch across nearly