When Oregon Highway Patrol Officers Stop a Driver for “Frightening” Camera Article By The Associated Press

On a typical weekday, about one in five highway patrol cars stop a driver on the highway for a traffic violation.

But on this particular Sunday, two officers on patrol stopped a driver who was driving at 70 mph on Highway 1 in the Pacific Northwest.

The driver was cited for speeding, which the agency considers a felony.

The officer who stopped him said he had to pull over because he was frightened and he was scared to be stopped.

The Oregon Highway patrol officers, who are part of a team of about 100, say that is no laughing matter, because these are dangerous drivers.

The Highway Patrol’s cameras have captured nearly 4 million speeding violations in the state.

The agency said it plans to hire more officers to take on the problem, but said it will not replace the old technology.

The cameras capture the speeding and other road rage incidents that are recorded in real time, and then the officers make the traffic stop.

The videos can be viewed online, but they are only recorded on a single device, which requires a person to sign up.

The officers on the freeway Sunday were part of an investigation of a man who had sped off in the middle of the highway on Interstate 5 in the western part of Oregon.

He was cited by the Highway Patrol for speeding and had to be pulled over.

The officer who pulled over the man said he felt compelled to stop the driver because he had witnessed the man speeding in the past.

He said the man told him he had been doing it for years and that he had done it every day for the last month.

“I felt very, very scared,” the officer said.

“I wanted to protect myself.”

The officer said he did not feel safe stopping the man because he is a law enforcement officer, and that if he did, he would be fired.

The man, who was not identified, told The Associated Post that he was speeding in a 20-mph zone.

He asked the officer why he was stopped, and he said, “I’m going to do something about it.”

The officer pulled the man over, then got out his camera and pointed it at the driver’s side window and said, ‘Do you have a camera on this?’

The man said that he did have one on his car and that it was pointed at the road.

He pulled it out and started recording.

He said that after about 10 seconds, he realized he was on a highway.

He got out of his car to get a breathalyzer, but he was too scared to do so because he didn’t know what to do.

The two officers, along with several other highway patrol officers and other law enforcement officers, stopped the man.

They searched the car for weapons, and they found a BB gun and a large piece of wood in the driver�s glove compartment.

The Oregon highway patrol said the officers then gave the driver a citation for speeding.

The Highway Patrol said the officer who was stopped had been wearing a body camera for more than three years and had taken it off the police body camera after the incident.

The video shows the man, wearing a shirt and pants, walking away from the officer on the shoulder of the freeway and then getting into his car.

The man walks toward the camera with his hand in the air, and the officer appears to be looking back at him.

The video then cuts to black.

The department said in a statement Monday that the officers involved in the traffic incident had been trained in the department�s use of body cameras and that they are not being terminated.

‘No More Sex’ for the Road: Why ‘No more sex’ will be no more than a matter of time

A year after it became the subject of a Twitter spat, the state of California is again facing the threat of its roadways becoming an online cesspool.

A report published by the State Bicycle Commission says that California’s population is rising, with the number of registered vehicles rising by about 40% between 2015 and 2020, and the number and size of traffic fatalities going up by nearly 80%.

“It is clear that there are more drivers and more vehicles, and more collisions,” the report states.

“That’s the reality of today.

We need to get better at making sure the roads are safe for everyone.””

And the solution to this is to get rid of the traffic lights and make roads more safe and more accessible to people who are more physically fit, who are less stressed and who have a higher sense of well-being.”

We need to get better at making sure the roads are safe for everyone.

“The report recommends that all drivers on the roads be licensed and required to wear a helmet, and to install flashing lights and a “bicycle awareness” device.

But that is just the beginning of the problem, as California’s roadways have been plagued with crashes.

In the last 10 years, there have been over 200 fatal crashes involving cars and bicyclists.

And a 2015 study by the University of California found that at least 3,200 bicyclists were killed in California every year from 2006 to 2015.

The report says that drivers who cause fatal crashes are more likely to be male, older and in a lower-paying job than the average driver, and are more at risk for collisions, especially on rural roads.

It adds that the California Highway Patrol has reported that, since the implementation of the state’s traffic safety laws, crashes involving bicyclists have increased by about 100% in the state.

In response, the State Highway Patrol, the California Department of Transportation and the California Air Resources Board have taken action, implementing “zero tolerance” rules that prohibit drivers from turning right into oncoming traffic or from driving on the shoulder.

“It’s time for California to get its act together and stop this epidemic of road death and injury. “

No more traffic,” the agency says.

“I am committed to making the roads safer and more safe for everybody, including our children and families,” said Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg.”

I am committed to making the roads safer and more safe for everybody, including our children and families,” said Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg.

OREGON highway closures for next week as floodwaters threaten to shut down the road for two weeks

A flood that has shut down Highway 1 north of the city of Eugene, Oregon, and damaged a major bridge in Portland has caused delays in the construction of several major highways, including the East Coast Highway that runs through the state.

The Oregon Department of Transportation said Thursday that the East Oregon Tollway will close temporarily from Monday to Friday as flood waters continue to surge in the Portland area.

The agency said a portion of the Eastbound East Oregon Highway will close at 10 a.m.

Monday through Wednesday, while a portion from the Westbound East Coast Tollway from 10 a and 6 p.m., and the Oregon Highway from 10 p. and 4 a. m. will remain open for a day.

Construction of the Interstate 5 and 5-Line Freeway, which is part of the interstate system, will resume Thursday morning, the agency said.

The highway, which spans from the northern Oregon town of Whitefish to the city and surrounding towns of Salem, is a major artery for drivers heading to the Oregon Coast.

The Interstate 5 bridge over the Columbia River, the main artery through Oregon, is closed for a short time on Thursday as floodwater surges over the bridge, the Oregon Department’s Bureau of Transportation spokesman, John Anderson, said.

“There is an ongoing water level at the bridge.

There’s a lot of water in the bridge,” he said.

There is no immediate threat to the bridge’s life.

It’s currently under reconstruction, he said, adding that the bridge will be open later Thursday for people who need to cross it.

The bridge, which was built in 1965, has a bridge span of about 15 feet and has a water level of about 2 feet, he added.

The roadway will remain closed from 10:30 p. m., Wednesday through Sunday.

Officials have said the road will reopen Friday afternoon, when the river will resume flowing, but Anderson said he could not provide more information about the exact date.

The flood, which has caused more than $100 million in damage, has forced the closure of all major highways in the state for two days.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said the agency is monitoring the flood for any further damage.

“This is a very large and complex project,” FEMA Administrator Brock Long said Thursday.

“We are still working to identify and assess the damage to the road.

There will be significant impacts to the state and our nation’s economy.”

In Washington state, a flood that was expected to have minimal impact on the state’s highways has prompted the closure for a week of major highways.

The Highway 99 bridge, one of the major arteries through the Northwest, was shut down at 1 p. e.m.(Pacific time) Thursday and the bridge is expected to be open for two more days.

State officials say that the shutdown is expected “as a result of increased water levels in the Columbia river and to protect against flooding during a severe weather event,” which could result from a possible cyclone or flood.

Highway 99 from Olympia to Tacoma is closed as crews begin work to rebuild the bridge that spans from Oregon to Washington state.

It was closed on Monday for the second time this week after heavy rain in the Northwest.

The National Weather Service said Thursday morning that the state is facing a “very high” risk of severe weather and that conditions may worsen as the day goes on.

Flooding is expected on Thursday in Oregon and other states that have received heavy rainfall.

The Washington Department of Emergency Management said it has been working with the National Weather Services and the U.S. Coast Guard to monitor the flood situation and to provide critical updates.

The federal agency also tweeted on Thursday that it is sending more than a dozen National Guard aircraft to help with the rebuilding efforts.

The Coast Guard says it will deploy four aircraft and six watercraft to help restore the Columbia’s capacity to release storm surge from the region.

The agencies said that the National Guard has already deployed to the area, but that the Coast Guard expects the flood waters to increase significantly in the coming days.

“Our teams will remain on the ground and continue to provide immediate assistance to people and structures as conditions dictate,” the National Coast Guard tweeted.

“In the meantime, we have begun the process of evacuating the area.

We are working closely with the local and state governments to assess and assess damage to infrastructure.”

The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, which operates the Columbia and other waterways, issued a flood warning for portions of the Columbia from Seattle to Tacoma.

In a statement Thursday, the Corps said it is working to maintain its capacity to provide essential services to people in need.

The Corps warned that the storm surge will cause significant damage to homes and businesses.

Floodwaters are expected to rise as high as 14 feet in some areas and 12 feet in others.

The Columbia River is the nation’s fourth-largest river, and is considered a major source of flooding and erosion.

The river’s banks stretch across nearly